SUMMARY OF POINTS ON OUTDOOR CLOTHING    from Honora

 

NZ has a maritime climate i.e. a wide variety of weather conditions are encountered on trips. When you’re moving you’re hot but when you stop you can get cold. So it’s important to not only have the right clothes but to wear them appropriately. Otherwise you can run into problems of morale, accidents, hypo/hyperthermia, frostbite or dehydration

 

CAUSES OF HEAT LOSS

  1. Convection                by wind
  2. Conduction               by direct contact with cold
  3. Radiation                   by lack of insulation allowing infra red to radiate out

 

AREAS OF GREATEST HEAT LOSS

 

The head, throat, chest and other areas where arteries are superficial e.g. the femoral and brachial arteries that radiate heat from the groins and arms

 

TO REDUCE HEAT LOSS:

Promote Insulation by trapping air

Keep dry by wearing shells and allowing clothing to ventilate and not being overdressed.

 

MODERN FABRICS FOR LAYERING

 

Body Layer:

Polypropylene

Polartec®

Windstopper technology e.g. next to skin

Merino (Icebreaker, Everwarm)

 

Insulation Layer:

Polarfleece, Polartec.

Down or synthetic equivalent e.g. Holofil

Merino

 

Outer Shell: modern fabrics expensive due to stringent quality control. Are under guarantee. Most well –known are:

Goretex®: 2 layers: 1st has micropores. 2nd repels oils (and sea water). Heavy, so used in 2, and 3 layer combinations. Can be washed in ordinary powder, tumble dried. Breathability has been compromised by using PFTE to repel oils. See http://www.montane.no/info-base/breathability.pdf

Milair®, Reflex® Attracts and carries water out using differential between inside and outside air pressures cause by difference in temperature. So if arms are very cold, they still get wet. Use soap flakes only to wash.

Event® is reputed to be more breathable and effective.

 

 

 

MANAGEMENT

Anticipate, don’t react.

Avoid getting hot and cold by anticipating conditions.

Think where and how long to stop. Keep warm gear, wet weather gear and snacks handy. Have lunches you can eat quickly. Layer up before coming out of bushline, other exposed places and when stopped for lunch, lean against or sit on pack or something insulating. Change into dry clothes at end of day.

 

Regulate temperature

Adjust speed of travel. Be aware of areas of greatest heat loss (hats, scarves for throat and chest, dry gloves or socks for hands, feet).

 

Keep things dry

Spare clothing including gloves and socks, avoid overheating, dry clothes while sleeping, turn parka inside out to dry, plastic bags for feet.